Scammer dating

While most scammers have to work for months before they’re able to convince their targets to send them money, Stephanie Monson did all the work for the scammer in, like, two seconds by immediately emptying her bank account the moment his one-word message showed up in her inbox.While it’s certainly tragic that she lost her entire life’s savings in one fell swoop, you’ve got to admit that the blame ultimately lies with Stephanie for Western Unioning 0,000 to a phone number she did not recognize and had only written “hello.” Her scammer didn’t even have the opportunity to try and emotionally manipulate her with poetic texts and fake pictures of himself before she cleaned out her 401(k) and sent it his way. Someone starts chatting with you through an online dating service and you enjoy the long chats with them and eventually become interested.But then right out of the blue they need some money – a looming personal crisis or a short term lack of funds. Online dating fraud rose by 33% last year 88% of dating fraud is online – the rest is by post, through newspapers and in person The UK public lost £34 million to “romance” fraudsters in 2014 The average reported loss is between £2000 and £3000 The average time between initial contact and the realisation that you have been conned is 6 weeks Average victim age is between 45 and 60 years old 57% of victims are female In the UK 89% of reported scams occur in Birmingham and London Here are a few of the more obvious scams that are around and some tell-tale things to look out for. You meet someone online who seems really interested in getting to know you. They say all of the right things to build a believable story and gain your trust. Eventually their story will lead to them having a financial problem and you will feel compelled to help them. You are then left broken hearted when your new love disappears along with your money. You may even start to fall head over heels for this person. Before long they ask for more – then more, and more, and more. No one wants to think that they could fall for an internet dating scam, and yet hundreds of people fall victim to such scams every single year.

Instead of being slowly lured into an emotional and psychological trap of ever-increasing complexity, Stephanie really jumped the fucking gun and wasted no time liquidating her daughter’s college fund.

Upon finding victims, scammers lure them to more private means of communication, (such as providing an e-mail address) to allow for fraud to occur.

The fraud typically involves the scammer acting as if they've quickly fallen for the victim so that when they have the opportunity to ask for money, the victim at that time has become too emotionally involved, and will have deep feelings of guilt if they decline the request for money from the scammer.

In a mere matter of moments, she completely destroyed her life, forcing her home into foreclosure by falling for a scam that, if we’re being honest, really hadn’t started at all.

Super sad she doesn’t have a home anymore and now her daughter hates her, but, Stephanie, come on: At least let him send flowers to your house and promise you a getaway to an Italian villa before falling for this one. While our hearts go out to Stephanie for the incredible loss she sustained, there’s really no two ways about it: She should have seen this one coming from a mile away.

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